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"Pay it Forward" aims to change how students fund college

USA TODAY  | February 21, 2014 | Alex Koma, USA TODAY Collegiate Correspondent
A bill making its way through Washington state’s House of Representatives has the potential to change the way students pay for college. Instead of paying up front and taking out student loans, state Rep. Larry Seaquist’s “Pay it Forward” program would let students pay for their education after they graduate by deducting a set percentage of their future income for up to 25 years. [full article]
 

Share My Lesson to host virtual conference in March

Share My Lesson will host on March 11-13 an unprecedented virtual conference of 24 webinars for educators and parents, ranging from creative ways to teach the arts and natural sciences, proactive and positive behavior management tips, and ways to cultivate innovative thinkers.

University of Illinois-Chicago faculty wage two-day strike

Pushed to the wall after 18 months of bargaining for a first contract, 1,100 faculty at the University of Illinois at Chicago went on strike Feb. 18 and 19. It was the first strike in recent memory at a research institution and, as such, generated a lot of media attention both in Chicago and across the nation.

Bill aims to eliminate up-front college costs

February 16, 2014 | Lisa Baumann

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Students in Washington state could be among the first to go to college without having to worry about paying tuition up front. Instead, under a bill proposed in the House, they'd pay after leaving school in the form of a small, fixed percentage of their future income for up to 25 years. . . . The idea of former students paying as long as 25 years is just one piece of the bill that bothers Karen Strickland, president of AFT Washington, a state federation affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers, AFL-CIO. [full article]

A hand up is not a handout

In her latest column appearing in the New York Times, AFT President Randi Weingarten urges lawmakers to strengthen the rungs on America's ladder of opportunity.

Court says Mich. research assistants have right to bargain

A United States District Court has ruled that the Legislature and governor of Michigan violated the state's constitution in 2012, when they passed and signed into law a provision saying graduate research assistants at the University of Michigan are students, not employees, and therefore don't have the right to decide on the question of collective bargaining.

Thousands come together for National Day of Action

The National Day of Action to Reclaim the Promise of Public Education brought together thousands of educators, parents, students and community members who attended more than 100 events around the country, despite challenging weather conditions in many locations.

Reclaiming the Promise of Public Education

AFT Washington President Karen Strickland on the importance of a public education system that supports those who work at schools and colleges with adequate resources and professional development as well as providing the community and students with the ability to achieve their dreams.

Green River Community College Faculty Want Increase in Salaries

Seattle Times Education Blog | by Katherine Long, reporter | Nov. 22 with update on Nov. 23

More than 150 Green River Community College faculty members presented a petition to the college’s board of trustees Thursday asking that an increase in state funding be put toward a boost in faculty salaries, particularly for adjunct faculty. [read full story]

Why Is the Media Biased?

8/1/12
From the AFL-CIO Blog | Berry Craig, Guest Columnist

The Scoop on Media Bias

Berry Craig, recording secretary for the Paducah-based Western Kentucky AFL-CIO and a professor of history at West Kentucky Community and Technical College, is a former daily newspaper columnist and Associated Press columnist and currently a member of AFT Local 1360.

Why is the media so anti-union?

This old reporter-turned-history-teacher could retire if he had a dime for every time he's heard a union brother or sister ask that question. [read full article]